Tide Pods: Nom-Nom or No-No?

Pods

pods 1Tide Detergent Pods: Bright colored, bite size and look like a sweet gummy treat! The container even looks like a candy or cookie jar! Kids are likely to pop the pods into their mouths and land a trip to the emergency room! ABC reports some children start vomiting, wheezing and gasping for air within minutes of biting into one of the packets. Some had to be put on ventilators at the hospital.

P&G has released a statement saying it plans to switch to new childproof containers. The current containers are not childproof. But like any laundry detergent or poisonous product, it should be kept way from children. ***Double protect yourself. Keep poisonous products out of reach and locked!

Do you play peek-a-boo with poisons in your home? Let’s play a game! We are going to list household products that look like a yummy treat for kids, but could actually be poisonous.

  1. Blue Mouth Wash vs Blue Windex
  2. Orange Soda vs Orange Mr. Clean
  3. Water vs Rubbing Alcohol
  4. Tic-Tac vs Tylenol
  5. Gummy Bears vs Gummy Vitamins
  6. Powerade vs Mouthwash

And that’s just a few! Imagine all the products in your home that could harm your children, so remember: OUT OF REACH & LOCKED!

Please use these safety tips to help prevent unintentional poisonings in your home:

•Keep the National Poison Control Center hotline number by each phone: 1-800-222-1222.

•Get your home tested for lead. Lead-based paint was used in homes until 1978, so it is important to have older homes tested.

•Install a carbon monoxide detector in every sleeping area. Carbon monoxide is an invisible, odorless gas that builds up around fuel-burning appliances — and cars in garages — and is present in tobacco smoke.

•Stay alert while using cleaning products or other potentially harmful substances. A child can be poisoned in a matter of seconds. Never leave kids alone with an open container of something you would not want them to ingest.

•Keep make-up, hair spray, cologne and other personal products away from children. Good look for adults, but not a safe look for the kiddos.

•Do not refer to medicine or vitamins as candy. Children should not think of therapeutic substances as treats. And when you are administering medicine to your children, follow dosage directions carefully.

•Store medications and potentially harmful products in their original containers with the original labeling, out of reach of children.

•Learn which plants are poisonous. Keep poisonous houseplants out of reach, and teach children not to put any part of an outdoor plant in their mouths without adult supervision.

•Discuss these precautions with grandparents and relatives. Grandparents may have medications that can be very dangerous to children, and their homes are usually not as childproofed as yours.

•Learn CPR. In less than three hours, you can learn effective interventions that can give a fighting chance to a child whose breathing and heartbeat have stopped.

Join hands with Lexlee’s Kids in caring for your kids’ safety. If you have any questions or comments about poison prevention, feel free to post them here or contact Lexlee’s Kids at 225.372.3991 or www.lexleeskids.org.

Don’t Play with Poisons!

poisonprevention-NEw

March 20-26 is National Poison Prevention Week!  Poison control centers in the United States receive 1.2 million calls each year as a result of accidental poisoning of children ages 5 and under. Each year, about 68,000 kids in that age group are treated in emergency rooms for poisoning, and more than 50 die. Nearly 90 percent of these toxic exposures occur in the home, and 60 percent involve non-pharmaceutical products such as cosmetics, cleansers, personal care products, plants, pesticides, art supplies, alcohol and toys.  Please use these safety tips to help prevent unintentional poisonings in your home:

  • Keep the National Poison Control Center hotline number by each phone:  1-800-222-1222.
  • Get your home tested for lead. Lead-based paint was used in homes until 1978, so it is important to have older homes tested.
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector in every sleeping area. Carbon monoxide is an invisible, odorless gas that builds up around fuel-burning appliances — and cars in garages — and is present in tobacco smoke.
  • Stay alert while using cleaning products or other potentially harmful substances. A child can be poisoned in a matter of seconds. Never leave kids alone with an open container of something you would not want them to ingest.
  • Keep make-up, hair spray, cologne and other personal products away from children.  Good look for adults, but not a safe look for the kiddos.
  • Do not refer to medicine or vitamins as candy. Children should not think of therapeutic substances as treats. And when you are administering medicine to your children, follow dosage directions carefully.
  • Store medications and potentially harmful products in their original containers with the original labeling, out of reach of children.
  • Learn which plants are poisonous. Keep poisonous houseplants out of reach, and teach children not to put any part of an outdoor plant in their mouths without adult supervision.
  • Discuss these precautions with grandparents and relatives. Grandparents may have medications that can be very dangerous to children, and their homes are usually not as childproofed as yours.
  • Learn CPR. In less than three hours, you can learn effective interventions that can give a fighting chance to a child whose breathing and heartbeat have stopped.

Visit Safe Kids at http://bit.ly/ao3anH for additional safety tips, poison prevention videos and games!  Do you play peek-a-boo with poisons in your home? Join hands with Lexlee’s Kids in caring for your kids’ safety. If you have any questions or comments about poison prevention, feel free to post them here or contact Lexlee’s Kids at 225.761.7272 or www.lexleeskids.org.